Food which helps to boost and keep brainpower

Monday 26th, March 2012 / 15:49 Written by
Food which helps to boost and keep brainpower

Food which helps to boost and keep brainpower is important if we want to keep our mind clear and sharp throughout life. Of course, we should remember that only proper food is not enough. In addition to correct nutrition is also must be a constant active brain activity, which is promoted by reading books, challenging board games, crosswords, puzzles, mathematical tasks. But this time lets talk about proper food.

1. Blueberries
Sweet wild blueberries are bursting with antioxidants, which neutralize free radicals. Studies show that a blueberry-rich diet improves memory and motor skills and reverses age-related declines in balance and coordination.

Chemicals in blueberries have a good affect on blood pressure, so decreases the risk of the stroke, because elevated blood pressure can damage delicate blood vessels in the brain and cause the stroke.

2. Dark green leafy vegetables
Dark green leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, romaine lettuce, leaf lettuce, mustard greens, collard greens, chicory, Swiss chard and (according to some sources) broccoli) contain folate and B12 or B6, vitamins, which are required for aging related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease prophylactic.

3. Salmon, sardines, and herring
Oily fish are full of neuroprotective omega-3 fatty acids. Higher levels of omega-3 in the blood go hand-in-hand with higher levels of serotonin, a mood-enhancing brain chemical. A study from the Rush Institute for Healthy Ageing in Chicago found that people who eat at least one fish meal a week are significantly less likely to end up with Alzheimer’s disease than those who regularly eschew fish.

Because a fish diet aids communication between nerve cells, studies have shown its positive effect on learning acquisition and memory performance. Try to include at least 2 portions of oily fish in your diet each week.

4. Spinach
Spinach are rich in antioxidant and folate. Researchers found spinach benefit in slowing down cognitive deficits and age-related problems in the central nervous system.

5. Grape juice (or in moderation red wine)
Study showed, that  grape juice has the highest total antioxidant level of any fruit, vegetable or juice tested. Also  grape juice significantly improves short-term memory and motor skills.

6. Whole grains and brown rice
Brown rice is filled with vitamins and magnesium, which is important to cognitive health. Whole grains contain vitamin B6, which aids in reducing homocysteine (chemicals, too high levels of which, relates with cognitive disease and Alzheimer’s disease).

7. Hot cocoa
Researchers  found that the antioxidant content of two tablespoons of pure cocoa powder is “almost two times stronger than red wine, two to three times stronger than green tea and four to five times stronger than that of black tea.” The antioxidants in hot cocoa protect brain cells from oxidative stress that can lead to Alzheimer’s and other disorders.

8. Nuts, notably almonds and walnuts
Nuts are rich in antioxidants and have been found to lower blood cholesterol levels due to their monounsaturated fat content. A Harvard study showed that women who ate more than 150 grams of nuts per week had a significantly lower risk of heart disease than those who ate 30 grams or less. And, they don’t contribute to weight gain as much as other kinds of fatty foods. Walnuts, in addition, are rich in omega-3s.

9. Olive oil
Olive oil contains the potent antioxidants called polyphenols. Olive oil has been shown to reduce blood pressure and cholesterol levels. The extra virgin olive oil is best. But remember – extra virgin olive oil is suitable just for salad, for cooking or baking is better to choose just virgin olive oil or olive pomace oil .

10. Garlic
This indispensable spice vegetable has strong antioxidant properties. It also contains strong antibacterial and antiviral compounds that help shake off stress-induced colds and infections. Healthiest is raw, crushed garlic; cooked garlic is less powerful but still benefits the cardiovascular system.

Source: The Guardian


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